Manila and Santiago: The New Steel Navy in the Spanish American War

by Jim Leeke Year Published: 2009

Manila & Santiago tells the history of the U.S. Navy’s operations in the Spanish War of 1898. This was America’s first “two-ocean war,” in which the decisive battles at Manila Bay and Santiago de Cuba were separated by two months and ten thousand miles. Our “new steel navy” came of age during this quick, modern little war. The battles were decided by colorful officers today largely forgotten ― by “Shang” Dewey in the Philippines and “Fighting Bob” Evans off southern Cuba. By Jack Philip conning the Texasand Constructor Hobson scuttling the Merrimac. By “Clark of the Oregon” pushing his battleship around South America. By Admiral Sampson and Commodore Schley, ending splendid careers in controversy. Beside these figures stood middle-aged lieutenants and overworked bluejackets, green naval militiamen and on-board correspondents, and the others who fought or witnessed the pivotal battles.